CONSERVING MOUNTAIN MARMOSETS FOR present and FUTURE GENERATIONS

PRIVACY POLICY       

PRIVACY POLICY       

© Mountain Marmoset Conservation Program/Programa de Conservação dos Saguis-da-serra /NGO PREA

mountain marmosets conservation program

MMCP conservation strategies

The process of restoring and conserving biodiversity has many challenges and many chapters ahead of it, ensuring that there is a viable population for the Buffy headed and Buffy tufted-ear marmoset is the most critical step in safeguarding the success of the long term goal.

There are three important conservation initiatives that we are progressing:

 

Investment into conservation breeding facilities to ensure that free ranging hybridization doesn't completely derail the goal of saving the species from extinction!

Data collection and analysis to shape and direct our decision making and strategies

Development of campaign materials to generate and motivate support for the program

The Mountain Marmosets Conservation Program is committed to researching and progressing conservation actions to conserve two important primate species, and contribute to the restoration of the South-eastern Atlantic Rainforest biodiversity. 

MMCP conservation strategies

The initial objectives that were identified in 2014/15 for conservation of the Buffy tufted-ear marmoset (C. aurita ) have already progressed with tangible results. The objectives for the Mountain Marmosets Conservation Program has been expanded into a program that is fully aligned with the 2018 Brazilian National Action Plan for the Atlantic Forest Primates and Sloths (PAN-PPMA) objectives defined for the Atlantic Forest Primates.

Buffy tufted-ear marmoset (C. aurita)

  1. To continue the survey agenda and determine areas of occurrence under a standardized field protocol (location, fragment size, isolation, proximity to invasives and hybrids/assessment of high risk isolated groups). 

  2. To use field survey data to identify priority C. aurita conservation areas and establish protective refuges for wild C. aurita populations.

  3. To develop a specific decision tree for field work and management of introduced marmosets occurring inside C. aurita’s native range.

  4. To expand the necessary scientific research to support an adaptive management plan for effective C. aurita conservation.

  5. To further enhance and expand the C. aurita conservation breeding program​​.

 
buffy headed marmoset (c. flaviceps ) joined the program in 2018
  1. To establish the survey agenda and determine areas of occurrence under a standardized field protocol (location, fragment size, isolation, proximity to invasives and hybrids/assessment of high risk isolated groups). 

  2. To use field survey data to identify priority C. flaviceps conservation areas and establish protective refuges for wild C. flaviceps populations.

  3. To develop a specific decision tree for field work and management of introduced marmosets occurring inside C. flaviceps native range.

  4. To establish a network of collaborators to contribute to the necessary scientific research to support an adaptive management plan for effective C. flaviceps conservation.

  5. To assess the relevance for establishing a C. flaviceps conservation breeding program​​.

The program has recently expanded to consider and tackle the lack of conservation actions for the Buffy headed marmoset (C. flaviceps) the only significant difference lies in the considerations and potential justifications for establishing a managed conservation breeding population as there are currently none in captivity and so there is currently no safeguard population! 

 

The Buffy headed marmoset (C. flaviceps) conservation status had long been cause for concern but during July 2017 – January 2018 following a Yellow Fever outbreak in the area of C. flaviceps range reports were coming in from a wide area that family groups that had been previously known of had seemed to have disappeared. ​Read more>>

 

There is an urgent need for a rapid survey program and potentially there will be an equally urgent need to implement a high priority captive breeding population. 

MMA & icmbio

Background to MMCP conservation initiatives and strategies

Orci massa purus tortor. Dictumst malesuada ornare mollis id adipiscing. Aptent. Ultrices, dictumst risus sapien non consectetuer. Quam. At aenean pede ligula taciti vulputate enim consectetuer maecenas potenti volutpat quam Integer senectus vestibulum fusce. Auctor aenean. Suspendisse aliquet etiam euismod dolor ornare cubilia ornare donec. Curabitur cras malesuada quis.

Nisi tincidunt Viverra ullamcorper. Cubilia. Tempus libero gravida. Duis volutpat class inceptos dignissim semper vitae Platea. Eget hendrerit semper natoque ac nam est ornare nisi orci feugiat adipiscing, quisque montes Hymenaeos iaculis. Venenatis Velit feugiat amet ipsum phasellus eu semper ad rhoncus ligula posuere ipsum risus semper sociis.
 

Brazil has a huge stake in the planet's biodiversity, the Brazilian Environment Ministry (MMA) sets out and oversees the government's environmental strategy. The Brazilian National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan (NBSAP) is an official government document, it is published online and updates are submitted to CBD (Convention of Biological Diversity).

 

The Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation (ICMBio) is the MMA planning and executing agency for nature conservation, research, and protected areas, which means that the Institute is responsible for the National System of Conservation Units (protected areas), and implements, manages, protects, supervises and monitors the protected areas established by the Union.


ICMBio is also responsible for promoting and executing programs of research, protection, preservation and conservation of Brazilian biodiversity. Inside ICMBio there are different departments, the National Research Center of Brazilian Primates (CPB) is responsible for the conservation of Brazilian primates. 

 

ICMBio identifies the contributors collaborating to progress the National Action Plan (PAN) for Brazilian primates. Each species has a representative who is nominated to monitor and boost the progress of each contributor. The representative who monitors the group's progress is a member of the GAT ((Technical Advisory Group) and reports through to ICMBio. their role is to stimulate, mediate and coordinate and report on progression of the planned actions that enable the country to realize its conservation objectives. 

 

The Taxonomic Catalogue of the Brazilian Fauna, published by ICMBio in 2015, confirms that Brazil holds the greatest biodiversity on the Planet! This was the first list of Brazilian fauna for over a hundred years and was developed with the participation of over 500 Zoological experts. 

This year, 2018, CPB started a new 5 years cycle of planning and implementing actions for endangered primates conservation called the National Action Plan (PAN) for the Atlantic Forest Primates. This PAN was elaborated inside the ICMBio headquarters by a team of invited stakeholders (researchers, zoo managers, educators, local government agents, local NGOs agents) directly involved with primate issues who are responsible for defining the document containing the Vision, Objectives, Specific Objectives, Strategic Actions, Tasks, Costs and Success Indicators.

Gat representative for the MMCP

Dr. Rodrigo Carvalho is the representative for the Callithrix aurita and Callithrix flaviceps species in this new 5 year PAN cycle, he is a member of the GAT (Technical Advisory Group) and is responsible for supporting, networking and guiding the local stakeholders who contribute to progressing PAN objectives.

global
conservation
strategies

This is a great space to write brief text about your company and your services. You can use this space to go into a little more detail about your company. Talk about your team and what services you provide. Tell your visitors the story of how you came up with the idea for your business and what makes you different from your competitors. 

global conservation strategies

Over the last two decades, biodiversity has become an increasingly important topic and the focus of many campaigns. The importance of conserving biodiversity cannot be underestimated; our very existence depends on conserving the living organisms that sustain the balance of a thriving, natural world.

In 1992  the proposal for a global collaboration called the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD)  was opened for signatures at the United Nations Conference in Rio de Janerio; by the end of the Rio Earth Summit the Convention had gained signatures from 168 countries.

The Rio Earth Summit was unprecedented, it was the first time that the scope of concerns regarding the health of our planet was heard on such a global scale, the summits message reached over 850 million people ‘ nothing less than a transformation of our attitudes and behaviour would bring about the necessary changes ‘. The need for environmentally sustainable development is now an ongoing global mission.

 

In October 2010, 179 countries gathered for the tenth COP (Convention of the Parties) on Biological Diversity in Nagoya Japan, one of the outcomes was a recommendation by Japan for a ten-year United Nations Campaign, in December of the same year it was agreed and the United Nations Decade on Biodiversity was launched.

 

The campaign objectives were clearly stated in a document known as the Aichi Targets, those targets created  a measurable framework to guide governments, organizations and individuals wanting to help to conserve the natural world.

To view the Aichi Target mandate click on the 2011-2020 logo above